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OHI
Omega Healthcare Investors, Inc  |  NYSE
1d5d1m6m1y5y10yAdvanced Chart
52wk high:35.14
52wk low:28.11
EPS:1.81
PE (ttm):17.76
Div Rate (fwd):2.60
Yield (fwd):8.07%
Market Cap:$6.35B
Volume:
  • Thu, Oct. 12, 4:40 PM
    • Omega Healthcare Investors (NYSE:OHI) declares $0.65/share quarterly dividend, 1.6% increase from prior dividend of $0.64.
    • Forward yield 8.27%
    • Payable Nov. 15; for shareholders of record Oct. 31; ex-div Oct. 30.
    Thu, Oct. 12, 4:40 PM | 95 Comments
  • Wed, Jul. 26, 4:54 PM
    • Q2 adjusted FFO of $179M or $0.87 per share vs. $173M and $0.87 one year ago. The dividend is $0.64 (raised from $0.63).
    • Full-year AFFO per share is now seen at $3.42-$3.44 vs. $3.40-$3.44 previously.
    • Conference call tomorrow at 10 ET
    • Previously: Omega Healthcare Investors beats by $0.02, misses on rental income (July 26)
    • OHI flat after hours
    Wed, Jul. 26, 4:54 PM | 19 Comments
  • Wed, Jul. 26, 4:41 PM
    • Omega Healthcare Investors (NYSE:OHI): Q2 FFO of $0.87 beats by $0.02.
    • Rental income of $193.99M (+4.0% Y/Y) misses by $40.24M.
    • Press Release
    Wed, Jul. 26, 4:41 PM | 46 Comments
  • Tue, Jul. 25, 5:35 PM
    • ABX, ACGL, AEM, AF, AGNC, AHL, ALGT, AMED, ANIK, ASGN, AXS, AXTI, BCOV, BPI, BWLD, CAI, CDE, CHDN, CMO, CMPR, CNMD, CNO, CSGP, CSV, CW, CYS, DFS, DMRC, DRE, EFX, ESND, ESRT, ESV, ETH, EW, FB, FFIV, FOE, FORR, FR, FTNT, FWRD, GG, GGG, GILD, GTY, HST, HUBG, INVA, KEX, KIM, KN, KNX, KRA, KRC, KRG, KS, LLNW, LM, LPSN, LRCX, LSTR, LVS, MAA, MB, MEOH, MLNX, MMLP, MMSI, MPWR, NGD, NOW, NTGR, NTRI, O, OHI, OII, ORLY, PCMI, PKG, PSA, PYPL, QDEL, QEP, RGC, RJF, ROIC, SB, SCI, SEIC, SIGI, SU, SUI, TER, TILE, TMK, TSCO, TYL, UDR, VAR, VRTX, WFM, WLL, WPG, XL, XLNX
    • For Seeking Alpha's full earnings season calendar, click here.
    Tue, Jul. 25, 5:35 PM | 17 Comments
  • Thu, Jul. 13, 4:47 PM
    • Omega Healthcare Investors (NYSE:OHI) declares $0.64/share quarterly dividend, 1.6% increase from prior dividend of $0.63.
    • Forward yield 7.79%
    • Payable Aug. 15; for shareholders of record Aug. 1; ex-div July 28.
    Thu, Jul. 13, 4:47 PM | 114 Comments
  • Thu, Jun. 29, 12:13 PM
    • Physicians Realty Trust last night announced another $735M of purchases.
    • Noting that DOC is now paying sub-5% cap rates for properties - dilutive to earnings and NAV - Jefferies analyst Tayo Okusanya tells Bloomberg there's concern MOB-focused companies can no longer do accretive deals for quality assets.
    • Healthcare Realty Trust (HR -3.5%), Senior Housing Properties (SNH -3%), Omega Healthcare (OHI -3.5%)
    Thu, Jun. 29, 12:13 PM | 38 Comments
  • Wed, May 3, 4:53 PM
    • Q1 adjusted FFO of $176.7M or $0.86 per share vs. $165.4M and $0.83 one year ago. Dividend is $0.63.
    • $38M of new investments in Q1 - $8M purchase and $30M in renovation projects. Sold during Q1 were 15 facilities for $45.8M in net cash proceeds, booking a gain of $7.4M. Eleven of these had been previously classified as held-for-sale. At quarter's end, another nine properties worth $23.2M are held-for-sale.
    • Full-year AFFO guidance is affirmed at $3.40-$3.44 per share.
    • Conference call tomorrow at 10 ET
    • Previously: Omega Healthcare Investors FFO in-line, misses on revenue (May 3)
    • OHI flat after hours
    Wed, May 3, 4:53 PM | 21 Comments
  • Wed, May 3, 4:49 PM
    • Omega Healthcare Investors (NYSE:OHI): Q1 FFO of $0.86 in-line.
    • Revenue of $192.54M (+9.0% Y/Y) misses by $5M.
    • Press Release
    Wed, May 3, 4:49 PM | 31 Comments
  • Tue, May 2, 5:35 PM
    • AAC, AEL, AFG, AGII, AIG, ALB, ANDE, ANIK, ANSS, ARRS, ATO, ATSG, AUY, AWK, BEAT, BGC, BKCC, BKFS, BKH, BREW, BRKR, CACI, CAKE, CAR, CATM, CBL, CBPO, CCRN, CECO, CENT, CERS, CF, CLR, CLVS, CMP, CODI, CONE, CRUS, CSGS, CSII, CTL, CW, CXO, CXW, DATA, EPE, EQC, ERII, ES, ETE, ETP, EVTC, EXTR, EYES, EZPW, FB, FCPT, FGL, FIT, FIVN, FNF, FORM, FOXF, FRT, FTK, GIL, GKOS, GLUU, GMED, GTE, HABT, HBM, HGV, HHC, HI, HIL, HIVE, HOS, HR, HRTG, IAC, INN, INOV, IO, ITRI, JBSS, JONE, JRVR, KAMN, KEYW, KHC, KND, LGCY, LHCG, LNC, LNT, LPI, LQ, LSI, MANT, MASI, MATX, MDU, MET, MFC, MGNX, MITT, MN, MNR, MTDR, MTGE, MULE, MUR, MX, NGVT, NLY, NSA, NSIT, NUS, NVDQ, NXPI, NYMT, OHI, OMF, OSUR, OUT, PDLI, PK, PPC, PQ, PRU, PRXL, PXD, QRVO, QTWO, RAIL, REN, REXR, RICE, RIG, RMP, RUBI, RYN, SQ, SRC, SSRI, STAA, STMP, SUN, SWM, TCAP, TEP, TGB, THG, TIVO, TPC, TRNC, TROX, TSLA, TSLX, TTEK, TTMI, TVIA, TWO, VVUS, WMB, WMC, WMGI, WPX, WSR, WTI, WTR, XPER, XPO
    Tue, May 2, 5:35 PM | 41 Comments
  • Fri, Apr. 28, 1:23 PM
    • The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services is considering changing Medicare reimbursement policy and cutting payments to providers with exposure to patients who use the system the  most, reports Tatiana Darie at Bloomberg.
    • Today's action by the CMS is only to solicit feedback on the proposed changes, but JMP's Peter Martin figures they could be implemented as soon as fiscal 2019.
    • The Ensign Group (ENSG -10.4%), Sabra Health (SBRA -6%), Care Capital (CCP -3.7%), Omega Health (OHI -2.6%), Genesis Health (GEN -1.6%)
    Fri, Apr. 28, 1:23 PM | 70 Comments
  • Mon, Apr. 24, 10:32 AM
    • A sizable whoosh down in longer-term interest rates over the past month had given some hope that perhaps the rate hike cycle was nearing an end, but the 10-year yield - as low as 2.16% at one point last week - has returned to north of 2.30% this morning.
    • Responsible for today's move is relief over the outcome of Sunday's French election, and European stocks are ahead 2%; the U.S. is up 1%.
    • The only sector in the red is the REITs (IYR -1.5%), (VNQ -1.8%). Another income favorite, the utility sector (NYSEARCA:XLU) is flat.
    • Realty Income (O -2.7%), Omega Healthcare (OHI -2.5%), HCP (HCP -3.3%), Vereit (VER -2.8%), Essex Property (ESS -1.9%), Simon Property (SPG -2.4%), Kimco (KIM -2.5%), Public Storage (PSA -2.3%), Government Properties (GOV -2.1%), Stag Industrial (STAG -2%)
    • ETFs: VNQ, IYR, DRN, RQI, URE, SCHH, ICF, RWR, SRS, RNP, RFI, JRS, KBWY, NRO, DRV, RIT, RIF
    Mon, Apr. 24, 10:32 AM | 36 Comments
  • Thu, Apr. 13, 5:55 PM
    • Omega Healthcare Investors (NYSE:OHI) declares $0.63/share quarterly dividend, 1.6% increase from prior dividend of $0.62.
    • Forward yield 7.4%
    • Payable May 15; for shareholders of record May 1; ex-div April 27.
    Thu, Apr. 13, 5:55 PM | 57 Comments
  • Wed, Mar. 15, 2:40 PM
    • The Fed hiked as expected, but maybe unexpected was very little change to the "dots" and the central bank's economic projections. Worried REIT investors may have been pricing in not just today's rate hike, but perhaps three more by year end.
    • The median Fed forecast, however, sees just two more moves in 2017.
    • The 10-year Treasury yield has dipped a full six basis points to 2.54%.
    • IYR +1.4%, VNQ +1.5%
    • Annaly (NLY +1.7%), AGNC Investment (AGNC +1.8%), Two Harbors (TWO +3%), Western Asset (WMC +2.7%), CYS Investments (CYS +3.6%), Realty Income (O +2.6%), Omega Healthcare (OHI +1.8%), HCP (HCP +1.7%), Vereit (VER +2.2%), Gladstone Commercial (GOOD +1.8%), AvalonBay (AVB +2.1%), Aimco (AIV +2.3%), Simon Property (SPG +1.5%), Public Storage (PSA +1%), Government Properties (GOV +3.4%), Summit Hotel (INN +1.2%), Stag Industrial (STAG +1.8%)
    Wed, Mar. 15, 2:40 PM | 42 Comments
  • Wed, Mar. 8, 3:55 PM
    • Helped along by a big 298K gain in February jobs reported by the ADP (the government reports on Friday), the 10-year Treasury yield is higher today by four basis points to 2.56% - pretty close to its highest level since the election.
    • Meanwhile on the short end, traders have priced in a 100% chance of a FOMC rate hike next week, with the next move after that coming by Labor Day (seems late given recent Fed talk).
    • While the S&P 500 and Dow are down just modestly, and the Nasdaq positive, the IYR is off 1.6% and VNQ 1.9% as REITs begin to face more serious competition in the yield department.
    • Realty Income (O -3.7%), Vereit (VER -3.7%), Omega Health (OHI -2.1%), HCP (HCP -3.1%), W.P. Carey (WPC -2.4%), Essex Property (ESS -1.2%), Simon Property (SPG -1.6%), Kimco (KIM -2.2%), Public Storage (PSA -1.9%), Government Properties (GOV -4.3%), Stag Industrial (STAG -2.7%), AGNC Investment (AGNC -2.1%), Annaly (NLY -1.6%)
    • ETFs: VNQ, IYR, MORL, REM, MORT, DRN, RQI, URE, SCHH, ICF, RWR, SRS, RNP, RFI, JRS, KBWY, NRO, DRV, RIT, RIF, REK, DRA, FRI, FTY, FREL, LRET, PSR, WREI, XLRE, IARAX, RORE, USRT
    Wed, Mar. 8, 3:55 PM | 82 Comments
  • Wed, Feb. 15, 12:38 PM
    • Janet Yellen is maintaining her somewhat hawkish stance in day two of congressional testimony. Alongside, Fed Funds futures are now pricing in a near-50% chance of a rate hike in March, and JPMorgan has moved forward its estimate of the next tightening from June to May. The 10-year Treasury yield is higher by three basis points to 2.50%.
    • The averages are all in the green, led by the big banks.
    • REITs (IYR -0.7%), (VNQ -0.9%) are having a tougher time of yet as income investors ponder alternatives.
    • Realty Income (O -1.4%), Omega Healthcare (OHI -2%), HCP (HCP -1.4%), Vereit (VER -0.5%), Equity Residential (EQR -1.2%), Silver Bay (SBY -1.4%), Simon Property (SPG -1.6%), Kimco (KIM -2.4%), Public Storage (PSA -0.3%), Government Properties (GOV -1.6%), Ashford Hospitality (AHT -1.2%), Stag Industrial (STAG -1%)
    Wed, Feb. 15, 12:38 PM | 38 Comments
  • Thu, Feb. 9, 1:40 PM
    • Gainers: BANC +20%. UIHC +17%. FNBC +11%. FXCM +9%. CXW +8%.
    • Losers: FSC -17%. FSAM -17%. FSFR -12%. RCG -6%. OHI -5%.
    Thu, Feb. 9, 1:40 PM | 11 Comments


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  1. A Liquid Prism for Refractive Index Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmiston, Michael D.

    2001-11-01

    A hollow glass prism filled with liquid becomes a "liquid prism". A simple method for constructing hollow glass prisms is presented. A method is given for a demonstration that uses the liquid prism with a laser or laser pointer so the audience can observe differences in refractive index for various liquids. The demonstration provides a quick and easy determination of the sugar content of soft drinks and juices. The prism makes it easy to determine a numerical value for the refractive index of a liquid.

  2. Shallow subsurface morpho-tectonics at the Northern offshore Sumatra subduction system using high resolution reflection and refraction seismics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, D.; Dibakar Ghosal*, S. C. Singh, A. P. S. Chauhan, H. Carton, N. D. Hananto

    2011-12-01

    The oblique subduction of Indo-Australian plate below the Eurosian plate regulates the subsurface geology of the Sumatra subduction system from south to north. Although many geological, geophysical and geodetic studies have been carried over since several decades nevertheless a high resolution subsurface image describing the detailed structural features over the Northern Sumatra is still missing. To scrutinize the northern part of this subduction system we had carried out a multi channel seismic (MCS) and OBS survey using a 12 km long streamer and 56 ocean bottom seismometers in 2006 and procured a high resolution deep seismic reflection and refraction data over a 500 km long profile mapping the whole subduction setting from the subduction front, forearc high and basin, Sumatra platform, Sumatra fault and volcanic arc. The acoustic basement along the profile is very complex because of its extremities lies in a range of 300 m to 5000 m. In order to overcome the imaging-intricacies caused due to the abrupt changes of water depth, we have downward continued the 12 km streamer data to the seafloor, which provides refraction arrivals from near zero offsets to 12 km, and subsequently a high-resolution travel time tomography keeping node spacing of 50m x 50m has accomplished to procure a detail velocity structure along the profile. We have conducted our analysis in two important areas at northern offshore Sumatra: (1) subduction front and accretionary settings and (2) forearc high and West Anadman Fault. Our main goal lies to observe the nature of shallow subsurface velocity distribution over these regions. Tomographic result of the subduction front demonstrates the changes in velocity gradient along up-dip. The 1D velocity gradients become shallower toward the subduction trench inferring the fact of lithification of accreted sediments around the accretionary wedge. At the forearc high adjacent to the Aceh basin a pile of 1 km thick low velocity sediments is underlain by

  3. Electrical Resistivity, Seismic Refraction Tomography and Drilling Logs to Identify the Heterogeneity and the Preferential Flow in a Shallow Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachhab, A.

    2015-12-01

    The study site is located at the Center for Environmental Education and Research (CEER) at Susquehanna University. Electrical Resistivity and Seismic Refraction Tomography (ERT and SRT), as well as several pumping tests were performed to identify zones of heterogeneities and hydrogeophysical characteristics of a shallow unconfined aquifer. The combination of these methods was selected to study the local geology and the subsurface preferential pathways of groundwater flow. 22 Dipole-Dipole ERT transects with 56 electrodes each and 11 SRT transects with 24 geophones each were performed. Drilling logs of 5 observation wells located within the site were also used. All drilling logs showed clearly the heterogeneity of the aquifer when compared to each other. The combination of ERT and SRT indicated that a potential zone of preferential flow is present within the aquifer and can be accurately identified based on the approach adopted in this study. The drilling logs served to specifically identify the soil and the geological formations making the heterogeneity of the aquifer. 3D ERT and SRT block diagrams were generated to connect all formations shown in the 2D tomography profiles to visualize the pathways of preferential flow and non-conductive formations. While ERT has proven to show saturated areas of the subsurface, SRT was more effective in identifying the bedrock-soil discontinuity and other near surface formations contributing to the local heterogeneity.

  4. Crustal structure of the Kermadec arc from MANGO seismic refraction profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Dan; Kopp, Heidrun; Sutherland, Rupert; Henrys, Stuart; Watts, Anthony B.; Timm, Christian; Scherwath, Martin; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Ronde, Cornel E. J.

    2016-10-01

    Three active-source seismic refraction profiles are integrated with morphological and potential field data to place the first regional constraints on the structure of the Kermadec subduction zone. These observations are used to test contrasting tectonic models for an along-strike transition in margin structure previously known as the 32°S boundary. We use residual bathymetry to constrain the geometry of this boundary and propose the name Central Kermadec Discontinuity (CKD). North of the CKD, the buried Tonga Ridge occupies the fore-arc with VP 6.5-7.3 km s-1 and residual free-air gravity anomalies constrain its latitudinal extent (north of 30.5°S), width (110 ± 20 km), and strike ( 005° south of 25°S). South of the CKD the fore-arc is structurally homogeneous downdip with VP 5.7-7.3 km s-1. In the Havre Trough back-arc, crustal thickness south of the CKD is 8-9 km, which is up to 4 km thinner than the northern Havre Trough and at least 1 km thinner than the southern Havre Trough. We suggest that the Eocene arc did not extend along the current length of the Tonga-Kermadec trench. The Eocene arc was originally connected to the Three Kings Ridge, and the CKD was likely formed during separation and easterly translation of an Eocene arc substrate during the early Oligocene. We suggest that the first-order crustal thickness variations along the Kermadec arc were inherited from before the Neogene and reflect Mesozoic crustal structure, the Cenozoic evolution of the Tonga-Kermadec-Hikurangi margin and along-strike variations in the duration of arc volcanism.

  5. Comparison of P- and S-wave velocity profiles obtained from surface seismic refraction/reflection and downhole data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; Stephenson, W.J.; Odum, J.K.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution seismic-reflection/refraction data were acquired on the ground surface at six locations to compare with near-surface seismic-velocity downhole measurements. Measurement sites were in Seattle, WA, the San Francisco Bay Area, CA, and the San Fernando Valley, CA. We quantitatively compared the data in terms of the average shear-wave velocity to 30-m depth (Vs30), and by the ratio of the relative site amplification produced by the velocity profiles of each data type over a specified set of quarter-wavelength frequencies. In terms of Vs30, similar values were determined from the two methods. There is <15% difference at four of the six sites. The Vs30 values at the other two sites differ by 21% and 48%. The relative site amplification factors differ generally by less than 10% for both P- and S-wave velocities. We also found that S-wave reflections and first-arrival phase delays are essential for identifying velocity inversions. The results suggest that seismic reflection/refraction data are a fast, non-invasive, and less expensive alternative to downhole data for determining Vs30. In addition, we emphasize that some P- and S-wave reflection travel times can directly indicate the frequencies of potentially damaging earthquake site resonances. A strong correlation between the simple S-wave first-arrival travel time/apparent velocity on the ground surface at 100 m offset from the seismic source and the Vs30 value for that site is an additional unique feature of the reflection/refraction data that could greatly simplify Vs30 determinations. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cycloplegic refraction is the gold standard for epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Ian G; Iribarren, Rafael; Fotouhi, Akbar; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    Many studies on children have shown that lack of cycloplegia is associated with slight overestimation of myopia and marked errors in estimates of the prevalence of emmetropia and hyperopia. Non-cycloplegic refraction is particularly problematic for studies of associations with risk factors. The consensus around the importance of cycloplegia in children left undefined at what age, if any, cycloplegia became unnecessary. It was often implicitly assumed that cycloplegia is not necessary beyond childhood or early adulthood, and thus, the protocol for the classical studies of refraction in older adults did not include cycloplegia. Now that population studies of refractive error are beginning to fill the gap between schoolchildren and older adults, whether cycloplegia is required for measuring refractive error in this age range, needs to be defined. Data from the Tehran Eye Study show that, without cycloplegia, there are errors in the estimation of myopia, emmetropia and hyperopia in the age range 20-50, just as in children. Similar results have been reported in an analysis of data from the Beaver Dam Offspring Eye Study. If the only important outcome measure of a particular study is the prevalence of myopia, then cycloplegia may not be crucial in some cases. But, without cycloplegia, measurements of other refractive categories as well as spherical equivalent are unreliable. In summary, the current evidence suggests that cycloplegic refraction should be considered as the gold standard for epidemiological studies of refraction, not only in children, but in adults up to the age of 50.

  7. Basement configuration of the West Bengal sedimentary basin, India as revealed by seismic refraction tomography: its tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damodara, N.; Rao, V. Vijaya; Sain, Kalachand; Prasad, A. S. S. S. R. S.; Murty, A. S. N.

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the sedimentary thickness, structure and tectonics of the West Bengal basin is attempted using pseudo 3-D configuration derived from the first arrival seismic refraction data. Velocity images of the West Bengal basin are derived using traveltime tomography along four profiles. The models are assessed for their reliability through chi-squares estimates, rms residual, traveltime fit, rays traced through the models and resolution by checkerboard tests. Tomographic images depict smooth velocity variations of Recent, Quaternary and Tertiary sediments of velocity 1.8-4.3 km s-1 deposited over the Rajmahal trap of 4.8 km s-1 velocity and the basement (5.9 km s-1) down to a maximum depth of 16 km. The present study indicates a south-easterly dip of basin as evidenced from the pseudo 3-D configuration. The basement depth along the seismic profiles varies from 1 to 16 km depending on its location in the basin. It is shallow in the north & west and deep in the east & south. The depth of the basement on the stable shelf of the basin in the west gently increases to about 8 km and dips to a maximum depth of 16 km in the deep basin part within a short distance in the east. The study identifies a regional feature, known as the Shelf break or the Hinge zone, where stable Indian shield ends and a sharp increase in sediment thickness occurs. The Hinge zone may represent the relict of continental and proto-oceanic crustal boundary formed during the rifting of India from Antarctica. The regional gravity map of the Bengal basin prepared in this study clearly brings out the Hinge zone with a linear gravity high that is compatible with seismic data. Presence of Shelf break/Hinge zone and Rajmahal volcanism in the basin suggests the influence of rifting of India from the combined Antarctica-Australia at ˜130 Ma due to mantle plume activity on the structure and tectonics of the West Bengal basin. These features along with the elevated rift shoulder are in agreement with the

  8. Basement configuration of the West Bengal sedimentary basin, India as revealed by seismic refraction tomography: its tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damodara, N.; Rao, V. Vijaya; Sain, Kalachand; Prasad, Asssrs; Murty, Asn

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARYUnderstanding the sedimentary thickness, structure and tectonics of the West Bengal basin is attempted using pseudo 3-D configuration derived from the first arrival <span class="hlt">seismic</span> <span class="hlt">refraction</span> data. Velocity images of the West Bengal basin are derived using traveltime tomography along four profiles. The models are assessed for their reliability through chi-squares estimates, rms residual, traveltime fit, rays traced through the models, and resolution by checkerboard tests. Tomographic images depict smooth velocity variations of Recent, Quaternary and Tertiary sediments of velocity 1.8-4.3 km/s deposited over the Rajmahal trap of 4.8 km/s velocity and the basement (5.9 km/s) down to a maximum depth of 16 km. The present <span class="hlt">study</span> indicates a south-easterly dip of basin as evidenced from the pseudo 3-D configuration. The basement depth along the <span class="hlt">seismic</span> profiles varies from 1 km to 16 km depending on its location in the basin. It is shallow in the north & west and deep in the east & south. The depth of the basement on the stable shelf of the basin in the west gently increases to about 8 km and dips to a maximum depth of 16 km in the deep basin part within a short distance in the east. The <span class="hlt">study</span> identifies a regional feature, known as the Shelf break or the Hinge zone, where stable Indian shield ends and a sharp increase in sediment thickness occurs. The Hinge zone may represent the relict of continental and proto-oceanic crustal boundary formed during the rifting of India from Antarctica. The regional gravity map of the Bengal basin prepared in this <span class="hlt">study</span> clearly brings out the Hinge zone with a linear gravity high that is compatible with <span class="hlt">seismic</span> data. Presence of Shelf break / Hinge zone and Rajmahal volcanism in the basin suggests the influence of rifting of India from the combined Antarctica-Australia at ˜130 Ma due to mantle plume activity on the structure and tectonics of the West Bengal basin. These features along with the elevated rift shoulder are in</p> </li> <li> <p><span>Development of a High-Resolution Shallow <span class="hlt">Seismic</span> <span class="hlt">Refraction</span> Tomography System at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute</span></p> <p>NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</p> <p>Henthorn, R.; Caress, D. W.; Chaffey, M. R.; McGill, P. R.; Kirkwood, W. J.; Burgess, W. C.</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>The Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) is developing a high-resolution marine <span class="hlt">seismic</span> <span class="hlt">refraction</span> imaging system that can be deployed and operated using a remotely operated vehicle. Conventional marine <span class="hlt">seismic</span> <span class="hlt">refraction</span> methods typically use low-frequency sources and widely-spaced seafloor receivers to image crustal-scale subsurface structure. These systems often employ air-guns towed from a surface vessel to produce acoustic signals ranging from 1-100Hz, and ocean-bottom seismometers to record the <span class="hlt">refracted</span> signals, resulting in images on the scale of hundreds of kilometers with resolutions no better than hundreds of meters. Images of subsurface structure at resolutions on the order of meters requires closely-spaced, near-seafloor sources and receivers capable of producing and recording higher-frequency signals centered around 3kHz. This poster will describe the first phase development of the High-Resolution Shallow <span class="hlt">Seismic</span> <span class="hlt">Refraction</span> Tomography System at MBARI including the science drivers, the design approach and trade-offs, and results from initial field tests conducted in the Monterey Bay. The capability to image fine-scale subsurface structure will augment ongoing research on hydrate deposits. Methane and the other hydrocarbon gases trapped in hydrates are climate-impacting greenhouse gases as well as potential energy sources. Therefore, research regarding the formation, stability, volume, and structure of these globally common deposits has considerable relevance today. High-resolution subsurface imaging can impact many important marine geological topics such as submarine faults, hydrothermal venting, and submarine volcanism. The system combines ROV-mounted transmission of chirp acoustic signals with a roughly 1-6 kHz sweep and an array of high-frequency ocean bottom hydrophone (OBH) receivers. The configuration of closely spaced receivers and a source pinging at tightly-spaced intervals provides the opportunity to pick <span class="hlt">refracted</span> arrival times</p> </li> <li> <p><span>A successful 3D <span class="hlt">seismic</span> survey in the ``no-data zone,`` offshore Mississippi delta: Survey design and <span class="hlt">refraction</span> static correction processing</span></p> <p>SciTech Connect</p> <p>Carvill, C.; Faris, N.; Chambers, R.</p> <p>1996-12-31</p> <p>This is a success story of survey design and <span class="hlt">refraction</span> static correction processing of a large 3D <span class="hlt">seismic</span> survey in the South Pass area of the Mississippi delta. In this transition zone, subaqueous mudflow gullies and lobes of the delta, in various states of consolidation and gas saturation, are strong absorbers of <span class="hlt">seismic</span> energy. <span class="hlt">Seismic</span> waves penetrating the mud are severely restricted in bandwidth and variously delayed by changes in mud velocity and thickness. Using a delay-time <span class="hlt">refraction</span> static correction method, the authors find compensation for the various delays, i.e., static corrections, commonly vary 150 ms over a short distance. Application of the static corrections markedly improves the <span class="hlt">seismic</span> stack volume. This paper shows that intelligent survey design and delay-time <span class="hlt">refraction</span> static correction processing economically eliminate the historic no data status of this area.</p> </li> <li> <p><span><span class="hlt">Seismic</span> <span class="hlt">refraction</span> profile, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: field operations, instrumentation, and initial results</span></p> <p>USGS Publications Warehouse</p> <p>Blank, H. Richard; Healy, J.H.; Roller, John; Lamson, Ralph; Fisher, Fred; McClearn, Robert; Allen, Steve</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>In February 1978 a <span class="hlt">seismic</span> deep-<span class="hlt">refraction</span> profile was recorded by the USGS along a 1000-km line across the Arabian Shield in western Saudi Arabia. The line begins in Paleozoic and Mesozoic cover rocks near Riyadh on the Arabian Platform, leads southwesterly across three major Precambrian tectonic provinces, traverses Cenozoic rocks of the coastal plain near Jizan (Tihamat Asir), and terminates at the outer edge of the Farasan Bank in the southern Red Sea. More than 500 surveyed recording sites were occupied, including 19 in the Farasan Islands. Six shot points were used--five on land, with charges placed mostly below water table in drill holes, and one at sea, with charges placed on the sea floor and fired from a ship. The total charge consumed was slightly in excess of 61 metric tons in 21 discrete firings. <span class="hlt">Seismic</span> energy was recorded by means of a set of 100 newly developed portable <span class="hlt">seismic</span> stations. Each station consists of a standard 2-Hz vertical geophone coupled to a self-contained analog recording instrument equipped with a magnetic-tape cassette. The stations were deployed in groups of 20 by five observer teams, each generally consisting of two scientist-technicians and a surveyor-guide. On the day prior to deployment, the instruments were calibrated and programmed for automatic operation by means of a specially designed device called a hand-held tester. At each of ten pre-selected recording time windows on a designated firing day, the instruments were programmed to turn on, stabilize, record internal calibration signals, record the <span class="hlt">seismic</span> signals at three levels of amplification, and then deactivate. After the final window in the firing sequence, all instruments were retrieved and their data tapes removed for processing. A specially designed, field tape- dubbing system was utilized at shot point camps to organize and edit data recorded on the cassette tapes. The main functions of this system are to concatenate all data from each shot on any given day</p> </li> <li> <p><span>The GLIMPCE <span class="hlt">seismic</span> experiment: Onshore <span class="hlt">refraction</span> and wide-angle reflection observations from a fan line over the Lake Superior Midcontinent Rift System</span></p> <p>NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</p> <p>Epili, Duryodhan; Mereu, Robert F.</p> <p></p> <p>The 1986 GLIMPCE experiment (Great Lakes International Multidisciplinary Program for Crustal Evolution) was a combined on-ship <span class="hlt">seismic</span> reflection and onshore <span class="hlt">seismic</span> <span class="hlt">refraction</span> experiment designed to determine the structure of the crust beneath the Great Lakes. The main tectonic targets of interest were the Midcontinent Rift System, the Grenville Front, the Penokean and Huronian Fold Belts and the Michipicoten Greenstone Belt. The source of the <span class="hlt">seismic</span> energy came from a large air gun array fired at closely spaced intervals (50-350 m) over several long lines (150-350 km) crossing the lakes. Major participants of this experiment were the Geological Survey of Canada, the United States Geological Survey and a number of universities and research institutes on both sides of the border. The University of Western Ontario (UWO) collected data at five separate land stations using portable <span class="hlt">seismic</span> <span class="hlt">refraction</span> instruments. In this paper we present the results of a fan profile which was recorded from a UWO station on Michipicoten Island for the N-S line A which crossed the axis of the Lake Superior Synclinal Basin. The azimuth and distance ranges for this profile were 237 to 321 degrees and 120 to 170 km respectively. Detailed observations of the record sections show that p. is not a simple arrival but forms a rather complex pattern of irregular multiple arrivals. The wide-angle PmP reflection signals from the Moho are strong and well obilerved only for the shots fired near the ends of the line. The signals from the middle of the profile arrive relatively late and form very weak complex wave trains. These results indicate that the Moho in that area is probably greatly disrupted and gives added support to the rift theory for the structure under the lake. The observations also support the results of earlier crustal <span class="hlt">studies</span> of Lake Superior which showed that the crust under the eastern part of the lake was exceedingly thick.</p> </li> <li> <p><span>The crustal structure of the axis of the Great Valley, California, from <span class="hlt">seismic</span> <span class="hlt">refraction</span> measurements</span></p> <p>USGS Publications Warehouse</p> <p>Holbrook, W.S.; Mooney, W.D.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>In 1982 the U.S. Geological Survey collected six <span class="hlt">seismic</span> <span class="hlt">refraction</span> profiles in the Great Valley of California: three axial profiles with a maximum shot-to-receiver offset of 160 km, and three shorter profiles perpendicular to the valley axis. This paper presents the results of two-dimensional raytracing and synthetic seismogram modeling of the central axial profile. The crust of the central Great Valley is laterally heterogeneous along its axis, but generally consists of a sedimentary section overlying distinct upper, middle, and lower crustal units. The sedimentary rocks are 3-5 km thick along the profile, with velocities increasing with depth from 1.6 to 4.0 km/s. The basement (upper crust) consists of four units: 1. (1) a 1.0-1.5 km thick layer of velocity 5.4-5.8 km/s, 2. (2) a 3-4 km thick layer of velocity 6.0-6.3 km/s, 3. (3) a 1.5-3.0 km thick layer of velocity 6.5-6.6 km/s, and 4. (4) a laterally discontinuous, 1.5 km thick layer of velocity 6.8-7.0 km/s. The mid-crust lies at 11-14 km depth, is 5-8 km thick, and has a velocity of 6.6-6.7 km/s. On the northwest side of our profile the mid-crust is a low-velocity zone beneath the 6.8-7.0 km/s lid. The lower crust lies at 16-19 km depth, is 7-13 km thick, and has a velocity of 6.9-7.2 km/s. Crustal thickness increases from 26 to 29 km from NW to SE in the model. Although an unequivocal determination of crustal composition is not possible from P-wave velocities alone, our model has several geological and tectonic implications. We interpret the upper 7 km of basement on the northwest side of the profile as an ophiolitic fragment, since its thickness and velocity structure are consistent with that of oceanic crust. This fragment, which is not present 10-15 km to the west of the <span class="hlt">refraction</span> profile, is probably at least partially responsible for the Great Valley gravity and magnetic anomalies, whose peaks lie about 10 km east of our profile. The middle and lower crust are probably gabbroic and the product of</p> </li> <li> <p><span><span class="hlt">Studies</span> of atmospheric <span class="hlt">refraction</span> effects on laser data</span></p> <p>NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</p> <p>Dunn, P. J.; Pearce, W. A.; Johnson, T. S.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">refraction</span> effect from three perspectives was considered. An analysis of the axioms on which the accepted correction algorithms were based was the first priority. The integrity of the meteorological measurements on which the correction model is based was also considered and a large quantity of laser observations was processed in an effort to detect any serious anomalies in them. The effect of <span class="hlt">refraction</span> errors on geodetic parameters estimated from laser data using the most recent analysis procedures was the focus of the third element of <span class="hlt">study</span>. The results concentrate on <span class="hlt">refraction</span> errors which were found to be critical in the eventual use of the data for measurements of crustal dynamics.</p> </li> <li> <p><span>Saudi Arabian <span class="hlt">seismic-refraction</span> profile: A traveltime interpretation of crustal and upper mantle structure</span></p> <p>USGS Publications Warehouse</p> <p>Mooney, W.D.; Gettings, M.E.; Blank, H.R.; Healy, J.H.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>The crustal and upper mantle compressional-wave velocity structure across the southwestern Arabian Shield has been investigated by a 1000-km-long <span class="hlt">seismic</span> <span class="hlt">refraction</span> profile. The profile begins in Mesozoic cover rocks near Riyadh on the Arabian Platform, trends southwesterly across three major Precambrian tectonic provinces, traverses Cenozoic rocks of the coastal plain near Jizan, and terminates at the outer edge of the Farasan Bank in the southern Red Sea. More than 500 surveyed recording sites were occupied, and six shot points were used, including one in the Red Sea. Two-dimensional ray-tracing techniques, used to analyze amplitude-normalized record sections indicate that the Arabian Shield is composed, to first order, of two layers, each about 20 km thick, with average velocities of about 6.3 km/s and 7.0 km/s, respectively. West of the Shield-Red Sea margin, the crust thins to a total thickness of less than 20 km, beyond which the Red Sea shelf and coastal plain are interpreted to be underlain by oceanic crust. A major crustal inhomogeneity at the northeast end of the profile probably represents the suture zone between two crustal blocks of different composition. Elsewhere along the profile, several high-velocity anomalies in the upper crust correlate with mapped gneiss domes, the most prominent of which is the Khamis Mushayt gneiss. Based on their velocities, these domes may constitute areas where lower crustal rocks have been raised some 20 km. Two intracrustal reflectors in the center of the Shield at 13 km depth probably represent the tops of mafic intrusives. The Mohorovic??ic?? discontinuity beneath the Shield varies from a depth of 43 km and mantle velocity of 8.2 km/s in the northeast to a depth of 38 km and mantle velocity of 8.0 km/s depth in the southwest near the Shield-Red Sea transition. Two velocity discontinuities occur in the upper mantle, at 59 and 70 km depth. The crustal and upper mantle velocity structure of the Arabian Shield is</p> </li> <li> <p><span>High-resolution gravity and <span class="hlt">seismic-refraction</span> surveys of the Smoke Tree Wash area, Joshua Tree National Park, California</span></p> <p>USGS Publications Warehouse</p> <p>Langenheim, Victoria E.; Rymer, Michael J.; Catchings, Rufus D.; Goldman, Mark R.; Watt, Janet T.; Powell, Robert E.; Matti, Jonathan C.</p> <p>2016-03-02</p> <p>We describe high-resolution gravity and <span class="hlt">seismic</span> <span class="hlt">refraction</span> surveys acquired to determine the thickness of valley-fill deposits and to delineate geologic structures that might influence groundwater flow beneath the Smoke Tree Wash area in Joshua Tree National Park. These surveys identified a sedimentary basin that is fault-controlled. A profile across the Smoke Tree Wash fault zone reveals low gravity values and <span class="hlt">seismic</span> velocities that coincide with a mapped strand of the Smoke Tree Wash fault. Modeling of the gravity data reveals a basin about 2–2.5 km long and 1 km wide that is roughly centered on this mapped strand, and bounded by inferred faults. According to the gravity model the deepest part of the basin is about 270 m, but this area coincides with low velocities that are not characteristic of typical basement complex rocks. Most likely, the density contrast assumed in the inversion is too high or the uncharacteristically low velocities represent highly fractured or weathered basement rocks, or both. A longer <span class="hlt">seismic</span> profile extending onto basement outcrops would help differentiate which scenario is more accurate. The <span class="hlt">seismic</span> velocities also determine the depth to water table along the profile to be about 40–60 m, consistent with water levels measured in water wells near the northern end of the profile.</p> </li> <li> <p><span>Crustal high-velocity anomaly at the East European Craton margin in SE Poland (TESZ) modelled by 3-D <span class="hlt">seismic</span> tomography of <span class="hlt">refracted</span> and reflected arrivals</span></p> <p>NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</p> <p>Środa, Piotr; Dec, Monika</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>The area of Trans-European Suture Zone in SE Poland represents a contact of major tectonic units of different consolidation age - from the Precambrian East European Craton, through Palaeozoic West European Platform to Cenozoic Carpathian orogen. The region was built by several phases of crustal accretion, which resulted in a complex collage of tectonic blocks. In 2000, this region was <span class="hlt">studied</span> by several <span class="hlt">seismic</span> wide-angle profiles of CELEBRATION 2000 experiment, providing a dense coverage of <span class="hlt">seismic</span> data in SE Poland and allowing for detailed investigations of the crustal structure and properties in this area. Beneath the marginal part of the EEC, the 2-D modelling of in-line data form several CELEBRATION profiles revealed a prominent high P-wave velocity anomaly in the upper crust, with Vp of 6.7-7.1 km/s, starting at 10-16 km depth (e.g., Środa et al., 2006). Anomalously high velocities are observed in the area located approximately beneath Lublin trough, to the NE of Teisseyre-Tornquist Zone. Based on 3-D tomography of first arrivals of in- and off-line CELEBRATION 2000 recordings (Malinowski et al., 2008), elevated velocities are also reported in the same area and seem to continue to the SW, off the craton margin. Gravimetric modelling also revealed anomalously high density in the same region at similar depths. High <span class="hlt">seismic</span> velocities and densities are interpreted as indicative for a pronounced mafic intrusion, possibly related to extensional processes at the EEC margin. Previous 3-D models of the high-velocity intrusion were based on first arrivals (crustal <span class="hlt">refractions</span>) only. In this <span class="hlt">study</span>, also off-line reflections (not modelled up to now) are used, in order to enlarge the data set and to better constrain the geometry and properties of the velocity anomaly. A code for 3-D joint tomographic inversion of <span class="hlt">refracted</span> and reflected arrivals, with model parametrization allowing for velocity discontinuities was used (Rawlinson, 2007). With this approach, besides the</p> </li> <li> <p><span>Results of a shallow <span class="hlt">seismic-refraction</span> survey in the Little Valley area near Hemet, Riverside County, California</span></p> <p>USGS Publications Warehouse</p> <p>Duell, L.F.</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Little Valley, a small locally named valley southeast of the city of Hemet in Riverside County, California, is being evaluated for development of a constructed wetland and infiltration area as part of a water-resources management program in the area. The valley is a granitic basin filled with unconsolidated material. In August 1993 and June and July 1994, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a <span class="hlt">seismic-refraction</span> survey consisting of four lines northwest of the valley, eight lines in the valley, and six lines northeast of the valley. Two interpretations were made for the lines: a two-layer model yielded an estimate of the minimum depths to bedrock and a three-layer model yielded the most likely depths to bedrock. Results of the interpretation of the three-layer model indicate that the unsaturated unconsolidated surface layer ranges in thickness from 12 to 83 feet in the valley and 24 to 131 feet northeast of the valley. The mean compressional velocity for this layer was about 1,660 feet per second. A saturated middle layer was detected in some parts of the <span class="hlt">study</span> area, but not in others--probably because of insufficient thickness in some places; however, in order to determine the "most likely" depths to bedrock, it was assumed that the layer was present throughout the valley. Depths to this layer were verified on three <span class="hlt">seismic</span> lines using the water level from the only well in the valley. Data for additional verification were not available for wells near Little Valley. The bedrock slope from most of Little Valley is down toward the northeast. Bedrock profiles show that the bedrock surface is very uneven in the <span class="hlt">study</span> area. The interpreted most likely depth to bedrock in the valley ranged from land surface (exposed) to a depth of 176 feet below land surface, and northeast of the valley it ranged from 118 to 331 feet below land surface. Bedrock depths were verified using lithologic logs from test holes drilled previously in the area. On the basis of a measured mean</p> </li> <li> <p><span>Marine <span class="hlt">seismic</span> <span class="hlt">refraction</span> data indicate Mesozoic syn-rift volcanism and seafloor-spreading in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico</span></p> <p>NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</p> <p>Eddy, Drew; van Avendonk, Harm; Christeson, Gail; Norton, Ian; Karner, Garry; Johnson, Chris; Kneller, Erik; Snedden, John</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>The Gulf of Mexico is a small ocean basin that formed by continental rifting and seafloor-spreading between North America and the Yucatan Block during the Jurassic to early Cretaceous. The lack of good, deeply-penetrating geophysical data in the Gulf of Mexico has precluded prior reconstructions of the timing and location of the transition from rifting to seafloor-spreading, as well as the degree to which magmatism influenced these geological processes. To illuminate the deep structure of this enigmatic region, we acquired four marine <span class="hlt">seismic</span> <span class="hlt">refraction</span> profiles in the northern Gulf of Mexico from the shelf to deep water as part of the Fall 2010 Gulf of Mexico Basin Opening (GUMBO) project. Here, we present the data and resulting <span class="hlt">seismic</span> velocity structures of two GUMBO profiles in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. GUMBO Line 1 extends ~330 km offshore south Texas from Matagorda Island across Alaminos Canyon to the central Gulf. GUMBO Line 2 extends ~400 km from the shelf offshore western Louisiana across the Sigsbee Escarpment. On both lines, ocean-bottom seismometers at 10-km spacing recorded 150m-spaced airgun shots over offsets up to 80 km. We use travel times from these long-offset reflections and <span class="hlt">refractions</span> to image <span class="hlt">seismic</span> velocities in the sediments, crystalline crust, and upper mantle using a tomographic inversion. On average, <span class="hlt">seismic</span> velocities increase with depth from 2 km/s near the seafloor to 5 km/s near the interpreted base of salt. On both profiles we observe a large amount of lateral heterogeneity in the sediments due to salt tectonics. The deeper <span class="hlt">seismic</span> velocity structure along GUMBO Line 1 also exhibits substantial lateral heterogeneity (4.5 km/s to 7 km/s) that may be consistent with crystallization of thin, ultraslow-spreading oceanic crust alternating with emplacement of exhumed mantle lithosphere. If the basement here is indeed oceanic, the prominent magnetic anomaly along the Texas coastline may represent the expression of synrift volcanism</p> </li> <li> <p><span><span class="hlt">Seismic</span> electromagnetic <span class="hlt">study</span> in China</span></p> <p>NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</p> <p>Huang, Qinghua</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Seismo-electromagnetism is becoming a hot interdisciplinary <span class="hlt">study</span> in both geosciences and electromagnetism. Numerous electromagnetic changes at a broad range of frequencies associated with earthquakes have been reported independently. There are some attempts of applying such electromagnetic data to short-term earthquake prediction. Although due to the complexity of seismogenic process and underground structure, the <span class="hlt">seismic</span> electromagnetic phenomena cannot be fully understood, the <span class="hlt">seismic</span> electromagnetic <span class="hlt">study</span> plays a key role in the mitigation of <span class="hlt">seismic</span> hazard. China is one of the countries which have the earliest reports on seismo-electromagnetic phenomena. The <span class="hlt">seismic</span> electromagnetic <span class="hlt">study</span> in China started in late 1960's. There are almost 50 years continuous observation data up to now, which provides a unique database for seismo-electromagnetic <span class="hlt">study</span> not only in China, but also in the world. Therefore, seismo-electromagnetic <span class="hlt">study</span> in China is interested broadly by international communities of geosciences and electromagnetism. I present here a brief review on <span class="hlt">seismic</span> electromagnetic <span class="hlt">study</span> in China, especially focusing on geo-electromagnetic observation and empirical prediction based on the observation data. After summarizing various electromagnetic observations such as apparent resistivity, geoelectric potential, geomagnetic field, electromagnetic disturbance, and so on, I show the cases of the empirical prediction based on the observed electromagnetic data associated with some earthquakes in China. Finally, based on the above review, I propose an integrated research scheme of earthquake-related electromagnetic phenomena, which includes the interaction between appropriate observations, robust methodology of data processing, and theoretical model analysis. This <span class="hlt">study</span> is supported partially by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (41274075) and the National Basic Research Program of China (2014CB845903).</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li>«</li> <li>3</li> <li>4</li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li>6</li> <li>7</li> <li>»</li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div> <br><img src="http://www.theoldwatchshop.com/omegapics/Dscn12510.jpg"><br> </FONT> </div> </BODY> </HTML>